Discoveries 1

       1 minute read

A collection of things found…always updated occasionally.



We must make the goal conform to the individual, rather than make the individual conform to the goal.

At only 22 years old, Hunter S. Thompson’s extraordinary letter on finding your purpose provides sound advice.



Trey Veazey has written a compelling request for help. Trey is a librarian from Glen Oaks Park Elementary in Baton Rouge, whose library lost everything in the recent floods (Aug 2016). As someone who has loved books since I was old enough to hold them in my toddler sized hands, his plight resonates with me. Read his account and request at A cry for help, or 1,600ish words on books, life, & honey buns.

If you want to help, donate via various methods Trey describes in the previous post and this one: Brass tacks, or specifics regarding where, when, how, etc.. My personal preference is DonorsChoose where donations are matched dollar-for-dollar when using the promotion code LIFTOFF.



A well written, transparent, and heartfelt story about a life lesson learned in I Got Scammed By A Silicon Valley Startup by Penny Kim.



Using regex statements can be painful, like a [insert bad metaphor here]. Simple Regex Language (SRL) is trying to help out.



Stranger Things on Netflix is one of the best series I’ve ever watched. We binge-watched the last six episodes in a single night. It was even a school/work night.



Reviewing pull requests (PRs) is difficult and tedious, so make it easier on your peers. Use small, frequent PRs versus large (& usually unwieldy), infrequent PRs in your software development (and documentation efforts). Write useful, detailed descriptions, saving the reviewer time understanding the scope and changes. In a nutshell, treat the code reviewer like your customer. The (written) unwritten guide to pull requests at Atlassian.



Steve Sasman describes driving his Tesla Model S across country, Uber’ing in it, letting others sleep in it (for a small fee), and renting it to other drivers, all over 100,000 miles in 2 years. Fascinating to see how much it cost him, or didn’t, in How I Used & Abused My Tesla.